Category Archives: Privacy/Surveillance

Some of the Ways Criminals are using Drones.

Nefarious use of drones is likely to get worse before it gets better, according to officials.

  • Counter surveillance of law enforcement agents is the fastest-growing way that organized criminals are using drones.
  • Some criminal organizations have begun to use drones as part of witness intimidation schemes: they continuously surveil police departments and precincts in order to see “who is going in and out of the facility and who might be co-operating with police,”
  • Criminal crews are using drones to observe bigger target facilities, spot security gaps, and determine patterns of life: where the security guards go and when.
  • Criminal groups have begun have used drones as part of elaborate smuggling schemes,
  • Criminal networks were using drones to watch Border Patrol officers, identify their gaps in coverage, and exploit them.

Read the full story here.

 

 

 

Drone used for Burglary Reconnaissance in Carletonville, Gauteng, South Africa.

Criminals in Carletonville have now devised a new plan to outwit observant residents and the police.
Mr Johan Coetzer, showed the Herald a shocking video of the new means that some criminals have now started using. According to him, he and his wife heard a buzzing sound in the air outside their home one evening.

‘We could see that our dog, who is very alert and was with us at the time, had heard it as well. We talked about it and decided it must have been the wind,’ he says.

It was only after some of their property disappeared from the family’s yard last Wednesday night, however, that the truth came to light. Coetzer says he immediately noticed that something was wrong when he walked out the front door on Thursday morning. After looking around, he noticed that a hose and lights that had been put up in their front yard were missing.

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Sheep Adapt Readily to Regular Drone Monitoring, Says Virginia Tech Study.

Researchers flew a drone at varying heights above a flock of sheep, recording their reactions and behavior. The results point to little interference.

Researchers at Virginia Tech’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have been studying the effects of drones on a variety of agricultural implementation, such as microbe analysis, and indeed, how drones affect the behavior of actual livestock such as sheep. According to Farmer’s Weekly, the evidence gathered seems to support the notion that sheep are largely undeterred from their regular patterns of behavior by nearby drones. Though some individual sheep may be put off at first by the unexpected presence of a whirring, aerial shepherd, adaptation occurs quickly and standard behavior resumes.

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Frenchman arrested for flying drone over residence of Cambodian Prime Minister in Phnom Penh’s Daun Penh district.

The French drone pilot, Pierre Michel Breckler, was arrested when he flew his Mavic Pro over the residence of Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen last Wednesday. Police in Phnom Penh’s Daun Penh district arrested the Frenchman when he was flying his unmanned aerial vehicle in Chamtomok commune near Koh Pich bridge.

On Thursday the district police chief Huon Chan Yaran confirmed that the drone pilot was arrested for using the aircraft to capture footage of prohibited areas without permission.

Read the full story here.

 

Surveillance Drone catches trainer Brian Sylvia secretly medicating harness racing horse.

The disturbing video shows Sylvia rip the tube from the horse’s nasal passage, causing it to recoil as it hits its nose.

Despite being caught in the act, Sylvia lied and protested his innocence right up to the day of his HRV disciplinary hearing in September.

He was given a 15-month disqualification and fined $2000 after pleading guilty to five charges including giving false evidence and failing to produce the horse for drug testing.

Read the full story here.

‘Predator’ Vision Drones Get Artificial Intelligence to Spot Poachers

Poachers illegally hunting elephants and rhinoceroses under cover of darkness may soon find themselves being tracked by “Predator” vision drones armed with artificial intelligence. The new AI system that enables surveillance drones to automatically detect both humans and animals could help conservation experts and rangers protect endangered wildlife starting in 2018.

A wildlife conservation group called Air Shepherd has already tested the AI system in a field demonstration and hopes to eventually expand such operations to various national parks in Africa.

Read the full story here.