Category Archives: Practical Uses

Innovative uses for drones.

Deputies use drone to find missing woman in Randolph County, North Carolina.

Difficult terrain and a corn field slowed the search on the ground.

Deputies and a K9 searched the area around the home on Thayer Road but Sheriff Robert Graves says difficult terrain and a corn field slowed the search.

Deputies then launched the department’s drone and were able to find the missing woman within 25 minutes.

She was reunited with her family.

Read the full story here.

Police drone finds lost hunter near Byron, Minnesota.

An 84-year-old man is recovering today in a Rochester hospital — and is lucky to be alive, authorities said — after getting lost while scouting a hunting spot.

Officers set up “an extensive search” in the area and quickly found the man’s vehicle. It was in a field about three-quarters of a mile off the road, stuck in mud.

Authorities contacted the Rochester Police Department, which deployed its drone.  The drone’s infrared camera spotted the man at 9:38 p.m., about 90 minutes after it was launched. He was found about 250 yards from his vehicle “curled up in the fetal position, soaking wet and unresponsive.”

“Considering the area they were searching, it was a great job,”. The man was found in an area described as “marshy” and not visible from the road or field.  “This is why we got the drone,” said RPD Capt. John Sherwin.

The Minnesota State Patrol helicopters were unable to fly because of the weather Saturday night, the report says.

Meet the PackDrone. An origami-like structure allows it to fold flat.

Inspired to create a drone that could be deployed in search and rescue missions to deliver food, water and first aid to those trapped, its collapsible, cage-like structure ensures the ultimate in safety and portability. We caught up with Przemyslaw Mariusz Kornatowski  to discover how he made the leap from paper crane to origami drone, and where the tech may take us.

The key driver for Kornatowski was to build a drone that would be safe flying in proximity to people while delivering parcels. But not just any parcels, he had a distinct purpose in mind.

Read the full story here.

Lifesaver drones will soon be auto-detecting sharks and shouting at swimmers from above.

One application we didn’t see coming is this, the Shark Spotter, a new initiative being tested by the Ripper Group out of New South Wales, Australia. In conjunction with local surf life saving services, the Ripper Group has been using a range of fairly serious-grade UAVs to assist with lifeguard duties.

From the shore, or even when you’re out there floating in the water, sharks are more or less invisible underwater, unless they decide to go the full Jawstreatment and poke their top fins out of the water. The inability to really see what’s happening underneath you is one of the reasons so many people have thalassophobia, or an intense fear of the sea.

But sharks are often very visible from directly above, so the Ripper Group is developing systems and algorithms that will give airborne drones the ability to constantly and automatically scan for sharks around surf beaches.

Read the full story here.

Las Vegas inventor develops drone counter-attack to stop active shooter.

In the wake of the tragedy at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, there has been a lot of talk about coming up with better ways to stop an active shooter.

A Las Vegas inventor and drone enthusiast says he has the answer.   When 8 News NOW was first introduced to John Mendonca two years ago, his drone golf game was beginning to take off.

Mendonca continued to tinker and create other ways to hone in his drone flying skills.

“So the first thing I made was a laser to burst the balloon, and then the other thing, I was making a squirt system, also to squirt a balloon,” Mendonca said.

But as Mendonca worked on his drone attachments, tragedy struck at the Route 91 Harvest Festival.  Out of the horrific shooting that killed 58 people and injured more than 500 others, came a realization, along with some inspiration.

Read the full story here.

By Pitching in to Help Storm Victims, Drones Earn New Respect

Among the drone owners involved in recovery efforts are the members of SWARM (Search With Aerial RC Multirotor), a volunteer group of UAV pilots focused on search and rescue, who sent volunteer crews to both Texas and Florida. Founded by California artist and UAV pilot Jim Bowers (whose alter ego is Demunseed on YouTube), SWARM is working under an emergency COA (Certificate of Authorization) to fly what the Red Cross calls Neighborhood Damage Assessments. A COA allows drone flights at locations, times and altitudes that aren’t normally permitted. Though SWARM had not deployed before the storms, the group quickly dispatched its members to Florida as Hurricane Irma departed the area.

Read the full story here.

 

Watch the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Mobile Command Center in action as they monitor IRMA damage using Predator Drones.

The crew that controls the predator and surviellance on it are inside the National Air Security Options Center at Naval Air station Corpus Christi including the cockpit.
Crews used the drone to take before and after photos of the damage.
“We are using the radar to map out some of the geographic points on infrastructure in florida right now for FEMA,” Roddy said.
“Whether it’s trees, damage to certain infrastructures like power plants and hospitals,” Durham said.
The vital information they gather is sent to ground crews.